Павел Масленікаў

Павел Масленікаў

Выдавец: Беларусь
Памер: 83с.
Мінск 2013
19.21 МБ

 

Аўтаматычна згенераваная тэкставая версія, можа быць з памылкамі і не поўная.
While working as a rector of the Belarusian State Theatre and Art Institute (1960-1964), P.V. Maslenikau did a lot to improve the educational process and enrich material and technical resources of that educational institution. There were built a dormitory and a second building of the institute, a sixth storey was added to an old building, classes were repaired, a city diner was reorganized into sculpture workshops, institute science was organized, the Students’ Scientific and Technical Society was created, the easel department was returned, the area of specializations of the department of decorative and applied arts was broadened, departments of monumental and decorative painting and of weaving were opened, and the part-time department began preparing theatre and art historians, the postgraduate department was opened. He was a decisive person and a fighter, who could defend his ideas. He radiated colossal energy that stimulated general rise of intellectual life. Pavel Vasilyevich considered that the most important thing was to find an idea, comprehend it and work on it and then rely on a team for its realization. He often said: “The department is sacred”.
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An employment history of P.V. Maslenikau consisted of two work places — the opera theatre and the Theatre and Art Institute. Official levels of an artist, art historian and teacher are reflected in this scarce documentary history: scenic designer (1938-1941), art director (1946-1960), rector (1960-1964), associate professor of the department of interior (1964-1967), head of the department of fabric decoration and styling products of light industry (1967-1978), associate professor of the painting department (1979-1995).
His organizing skills and noticeable in the republic activities determined great social work: in the Artists’ Union he performed duties of the Head of the Art Fund of the Artists’ Union of the BSSR, the Deputy Head of the Artists’ Union Board, the member of the Presidium of the USSR Art Fund Board; in different times he was in charge of creative sections of theatre and cinema designers, art critique and history; he was elected member of the party bureau of the opera theatre and the Theatre and Art Institute and secretary of the party bureau of the Artists’ Union, he was the chairman of the Scientific Council of the Methodological Centre of Folklore of the Ministry of Culture of the BSSR, the member of the Scientific Council of the Institute of Art History, Ethnography and Folklore of the Academy of Sciences of the BSSR, the scientific advisor of Encyclopedia of Literature and Art of Belarus, the chairman of the Great Patriotic War veterans’ section, the member of the audit commission of the Artists’ Union of the BSSR, etc. P.V. Maslenikau was a person of his time, an active creator of the Belarusian culture of the XX cent. He always had inner independence and sense of duty, the pathos of obligation.
The artist travelled a lot with his sketch-book. He visited India and Nepal, Sweden and Finland, France and Italy, Egypt, the Baltic countries, Ukraine, Russia and evidently he explored every corner of his native Belarus. He created a landscape chronicle of his journeys. His creative work is singled out by romantic mood and realistic depiction of nature. May be it came to life in his works as a symbol of the uprising against rationality and the norms of civilization as a right to release creative individuality.
Landscapes of P.V. Maslenikau are represented in all their genre diversity: city and architectural landscapes, seascapes, industrial and historical
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landscapes. He created landscape series Around the Native Land, The Altai Series, The Baltic Series (19670-1974), which were included in his personal exhibition dedicated to his 60th anniversary. City and architectural landscapes reflect different conditions and the geography of the artist’s journeys. They are Ancient Minsk (1987), Gurzuf (1987), Old Riga (1973), Rakov (1980), Minsk Side Street (1963), At the Minsk Outskirts (1963), Industrial Minsk (1964), Penza (1956), At the Shores of Odessa (1958), Helsinki. Quay (1973), Helsinki. Port (1973), Turku. Stones (1973), Indian and Mediterranean cities — The Outskirts of Delhi (1976), Naples (1958), Rome (1958), Near Constantinople (1958), Marseille. Port (1958). The most unusual event in the life of P.V. Maslenikau was his trek in Altai in 1972, from which he brought 70 landscapes on canvas. The most significant among them are Bridges Across the Katun, Mountain Song, The Maly Chamal, Teletskoye Lake, Over the Inya, At the foot of Chik-Toman, August in Altai, etc.
P.V. Maslenikaus landscapes recreate close to his heart nature. The artist does not suggest any unusual visual images but all the same there is still desire to admire their colour scheme endlessly. Picturesque distances, soft lines, unhurried rhythm of colour changes. Contact with beauty in its highest manifest, when aesthetics comes together with an ethic ideal, is felt again and again. Beauty is blended with good. Meaning woven into the visual base of a landscape grows from the life experience and inherits all its wisdom.
His miniatures painted in oil on small-sized cardboard are of special attraction. There are thoroughly depicted unique harmony of the green, the clear blue sky and reserved ocher-brown tones roads and paths on them. Harmonious illustration of natural life reveals the creative energy of the artist, designed to initiate a sense of beauty. Peculiar lyricism of senses and poetics of tender attitude toward his native land concentrate in a miniature pictorial form.
Pavel Vasilyevich also loved to paint “in close up” placing his sketch-book amidst thickets and choosing an angle of view close to a depicted object. The landscape Wild Forest (1982) as if drags viewers into its thicket. Large dark firs
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with branchy boughs grow next to light curly birches in contrast unity. Total calm of a summer day. But movements are shown by colour toning: from yellowish-green leaves of birches through dove-coloured velvet of bushes to the deep green of firs. Sunlight reflection and scattered maroon spots add expression to the work.
P.V. Maslenikau strived to depict changeable and elusive images of nature. In the Park (1983) he catches a unique state of approaching autumn, constantly and quickly changing colours of the plants, defenselessness of the trees shedding their leaves, vibrating breath of an autumn park. Colour and light tones of the landscape show this precise state of nature: broken lines, abrupt strokes, lightness and transparency of the texture that dissolves almost to the absence of colour following the path of the colour scheme running to “nowhere”. In the landscapes Golden Autumn (1994) and Leaves Fall (1982) the artist chooses a moment when leaves are still hanging on trees but the autumn wind has already touched them with its breath. The state of a constant season changing bears an imprint of immediacy. Vigorously painted landscapes provoke a sense of our presence.
City landscapes that were painted during his trip to India and Nepal (Evening in Delhi, Nepal. The Embankment of Katmandu, Katmandu. In Front of the King Residence, Morning in Delhi-, all — 1976) resemble shimmering dreams showing through the haze of Eastern nature. Bright golden colours of highlighted cupolas are lost in the air blaze. Juicy green colours dominate in the landscape The Outskirts of Delhi, they hide under thick shadow of the trees the white and purple caught by a sun beam. The work Near the Ajanta Cave Temple is distinguished by bright colours and high decorativeness. In this work richness and beauty of colour, variety of vertical or horizontal, prolonged or dotty stroke forms depict play of sunlight and air.
Among accomplishments of P.V. Maslenikau are his winter landscapes. He shows expression of winter scenes in their restrain mood and quirkiness of natural effects. Tonal relations are described in subtle nuances of colour and light. Diluted colours of a snowy winter day in the landscape Hoarfrost (1981)
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shine through a silvery-violet shroud. Shadows lie as overtones of light, the snow sparkles with a lilac blue. Frozen air masses cover the ground as a pearly curtain.
Over the Tisa (1967) is a wonderful work. The snowy Carpathian Mountains rise to the sky. The painting stuns with the power of momentary influence. As if from a bird’s eye view the snowy mountains and the abyss, the dizzy height and the depth of the Earth are seen. The painting enchants, hypnotizes and drags into the world of its sound of many voices and altitudes. Airy stillness of a frosty evening is felt and viewers themselves seem to get into the midair and hear the ringing silence of the mountains and see the last sunlight of the day. The look is directed at the horizon but it slips and melts in the haze that connects frozen water and the sky. Snowy cool calm gleams.
P.V. Maslenikau was always attracted by various atmospheric phenomena: morning mists, rigid frigidity of a winter day, hoarfrost airiness, cleanness and lightness of first snow, delicacy and transparency of the ice cover. On the Svisloch, The Svisloch Opens (both — 1992) are two landscapes that are different in the state of nature, mood and colour balance. However, when looking at these canvases, it seems that the author deliberately concentrated his attention at the differences in a similar motif of the landscape. The same river curve and the same riverside tangle, but nature is so changeable and unique that each glance of the artist reveals the new dynamics of its life. Severity of a frosty evening is shown through a deep intensity of colour and clarity of lines and drawing. A clear winter day is painted lightly and in harmony of shades of soft blue, violet and pink, light-green and grey.
Evening in March (1993), Old Pines (1992), Winter Twilight, Levki. Silence (1994), Logoishchina (1994), At the Forest Edge (1979), February (1973) — snow cover is shown in contrast with the brown green or muted purple of not yet fallen leaves of the trees that froze for winter. Spatial relations of colour give the composition its depth and lead viewers’ gaze into the image.